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The Ontario Medical Association deploys experts to myth-bust anti-vaccination sentiments

At a virtual news conference this week, doctors addressed some of the most prevalent online theories regarding COVID-19 vaccines.
By: Heather Marie Connors
January 22, 2021
Photo by Nathan Denette/The Canadian Press)
Photo by Nathan Denette/The Canadian Press)

The OMA assembled a panel of doctors this week for a virtual news conference aimed at assuaging the public’s fears around being vaccinated.

The misconceptions addressed included the idea that the vaccine was developed too fast, and is therefore unsafe.

"The truth of the matter is that the vaccine was tested extremely rigorously, and the speed with which we were able to develop the vaccine was based on improved collaboration," said OMA president Dr. Samantha Hill.

The panel also tackled the theory that people don’t need to get vaccinated because they aren’t at risk.

"As a family doctor, I would say I'm going to get the vaccine. There's no reason why you shouldn't, and there are no major, terrible ill effects that will cause bad outcomes worse than getting COVID-19," said Dr. Sarita Verma, president and CEO of the Northern Ontario School of Medicine.

According to the federal government, the most common side effects of vaccinations are site reactions, pins and needles, nausea, itching, chest discomfort and anaphylaxis - and the benefits of vaccines continue to outweigh the risks.

Source: CBC Toronto

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